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President’s Day FUN FOOD Facts

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  • President George Washington‘s favorite foods included fish and nuts. He also had a fondness for cherries, particularly Cherry Bounce, a brandy-based drink popular in the eighteenth century. He enjoyed the drink so much that he packed a canteen of it for a trip across the Allegheny Mountains in 1784.
  • The town of Cheshire, Massachusetts presented a massive 1,235- pound block of cheese as a gift to President Thomas Jefferson in 1802. The cheese was produced by combining the milk of every cow in Cheshire and became known as the Cheshire Mammoth Cheese; it was allowed to ripen at the White House for over two years.
  • President Andrew Jackson loved fresh milk . . . he loved it so much, in fact, that he kept a cow on the White House grounds to ensure a constant supply.
  • When President Abraham Lincoln was a young man living in Indiana, he worked as a cask maker for a local man making applejack brandy. Working with apples probably agreed with the future president; Lincoln was known to like apples, and often ate one with milk as a light lunch at midday.
  • President William Howard Taft enjoyed an enormous breakfast each morning. His usual breakfast menu included a twelve-ounce steak, two oranges, and several pieces of buttered toast.
  • President John F. Kennedy almost always had soup for lunch. Chowder was a particular favorite, a nod to JFK’s New England roots.
  • President Richard Nixon banned soup from being served at state dinners because, according to National Security Council staffer Roger Morris, “he almost invariably dribbled it on himself at the table.”
  • President Ronald Reagan was known to love desserts and high-calorie American fare. His wife Nancy didn’t approve, preferring that her husband dine on healthier fare. But when Nancy was out of town, all bets were off– the President dined on steak, macaroni and cheese, and chocolate mousse.
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